• Life Lately

    Work from Home Tips from a First Timer

    This is supposed to be the last day of the quarantine period. I think I have spent quite a bit of time working from home. It is not that different from working at the office. When it comes to working from home, it is all about balance and enjoying the benefits of home.

    Below are some tips which helped me in the process. Hopefully, these tips will help you get to the groove and optimize your time working out of the office.

    Follow the Normal Work Routine

    This is the hardest part to adapt. With the technology that enables our bosses to communicate and reach us on a regular basis, we can end up working 24/7 (including weekends and holidays). A 9 p.m. work email/message can wait until the next morning for a response. Know when to log in and log out. If you get into work at 8:30 a.m., then do not log in until 8:30 a.m. Establishing a limit on the hours of work per day is critical to the prevention of burnout.

    Establish Boundaries

    Do not interrupt one’s family time or social time in order to complete pending works. Take your days off seriously. Working on weekends/holidays is sometimes necessary, but taking time off can do more for your health, especially this quarantine.

    Make Sure to Take Time for Lunch, Snacks, and even Breaks

    Use a break to go out for a walk or a little chit-chat with your family. Breaks can recharge you for a better job. If you do not have the work-life balance, you will not last too long working at home. Allow yourself to take a much-deserved break; it is a great way to get away from work.

    Listen to Music

    I am not too fond of silence. For some reason, music motivates me for different tasks. When I need focus, I go for instrumental music. When I am bored, I go for pop or rock or something upbeat.

    Find Your Ideal Working Spot

    Just because you are not in the office, it does not mean you cannot have an office. It could be an empty room or a spare room. Since most of us do not have the luxury of having a new place to turn into an office, regardless of the space, set up an area that works best. Make sure you have enough natural light, too.

    Do Not Work from Your Bed

    It is essential to have a distinction between your relaxing space and your working space. This is another killer of productivity. While it may be tempting to stay in bed, you will find yourself sitting in a position that could end up with back pain.

    Pretend Like You are Going to the Office

    Get up, get out of your pajamas, take a bath, put on nice clothes, and make a coffee cup. With the right mindset, you will be able to get your work done.

    Plan on What You will be Working

    Projects do take time. Commit to do more than you set out to do. Before the day comes to an end, try writing your next day’s schedule. Having a carefully planned day can help you carry out more of your tasks.

    Dive in To-Do List as Soon as You Started Working

    It can be challenging to keep track of what you have to do throughout the entire day. Stick to your task list. After each completed task, cross it out.

    Stay Connected

    Our team makes use of Messenger as our mode of communication. Learn to communicate as much as possible. Do not be afraid to ask questions if further clarification is needed. Make sure that you check in on a regular basis, just as you would in the office.

    Technology Enables Remote Work

    You must have a laptop (I am using my personal), a decent Wi-Fi connection, and the right software to work from home. Find out what resources your company will be offering and paying for. (Hopefully, my company will reimburse me for these expenses.)


    At first, you may find it a bit challenging to get settled. But yes, you are going to adapt in no time.

  • Work/Money

    {Why} Work from Home is Not for Me

    With the current coronavirus outbreak, the entire Luzon has been placed under “Enhanced Community Quarantine” for almost a month. Many organizations are increasingly adopting telecommuting or work-from-home arrangements to mitigate threats from further transmitting the coronavirus disease in the country. As the outbreak has grown, more and more companies are encouraging employees to stay at home and operate work-from-home arrangements. Our company is one of those who responded. I feel lucky to be able to work from home.

    Honestly, I do not hate the idea of working from home. I feel that home is meant for fun things and the office for work. I do not fault anyone who loves the idea of working from home. Besides, we are all different and unique in many ways.

    I can focus on getting work done when I am in the office. Here are the reasons why work from home is not for me.

    No Dedicated Work Area

    Working from home is a perk for some people, but not when you live and pay rent for a small apartment where you have no space for desk or chair. While working in a bed sounds great, a desk, proper lighting, and a comfortable chair would be perfect for a productive day. Meanwhile, I am using a Megabox container as my desk and my bed as my chair.

    More Stressful

    Working from home is more stressful, more intense work pace, more vulnerable to working long hours, and higher performance expectations. I cannot count the number of times I have been handling separate discussions at the same time, which can make me stressed, especially when I still have tasks to complete by the end of the day.

    Temptations are Everywhere

    Home is filled with many distractions. When you are working from home, you are ostensibly free of distractions like chattering and singing coworkers. But being home, I feel obligated to do more household chores— clean the entire apartment, wash the dishes, dispose the garbage, and so on.

    Hard to Separate Personal and Work

    It is harder to switch off when your personal life and work are under the same roof. You sleep at home, and you are working at home. Establishing a line between work and home is tough. We have to find a way to distinguish between being “at work” and being “at home.”


    I cannot wait to go back to work. I wonder how people who work from home manage all of these. For now, I will stay at home as long as the health authorities advise.

    What challenges have you overcome?

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